Culture Lab U.K. (Culture-Lab)



Drinking Milk Reduces The Incidence Of Metabolic Syndrome


 


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A study carried out by the University of Cardiff indicates that consuming dairy products significantly reduces the risk of metabolic syndrome.


The twenty year study which was published in the ‘Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health’ states that metabolic syndrome increases the risk of death by 50%.


The study of 2,375 men aged between 45 and 59 classified metabolic syndrome as including two or more of the following; high blood glucose, insulin, blood fats, body fat, and blood pressure.


At the start of the study 15% of the participants had metabolic syndrome and almost double the risk of coronary artery heart disease and four times the risk of diabetes of those without the syndrome.


The researchers discovered that the men were 62% less likely to have the syndrome if they drank a pint or more of milk every day and 56% less likely to have it if they regularly ate other dairy produce.


The researchers made use of food questionnaires and weekly food diaries throughout the 20 year research to assess how much milk and dairy foods the men consumed and concluded that the more dairy produce the men consumed the less likely were they to have the syndrome.


The study’s leader, Professor Peter Elwood said that milk consumption had plummeted in the U.K. over the past 25 years along with a rise in concerns about its impact on health. He added, “Dairy produce is part of a healthy diet and its consumption should be promoted and the present data add further to the evidence that milk and dairy products fit well into a healthy eating pattern”.


Results Not Yet Accepted


However, Jemma Edwards, a care advisor at Diabetes U.K. advised against consuming large amounts of full fat dairy products in a bid to prevent type 2 diabetes and stressed the importance of a balanced diet and physical activity. She commented, "The results of this study are interesting. Dairy products are an important part of a healthy balanced diet and we recommend that people aim to eat two to three servings of low fat dairy a day. One portion is equivalent to a third of a pint of milk, one small pot of yogurt or a matchbox sized piece of cheese. Maintaining a healthy weight through diet and physical activity are vital in reducing the risk of developing type 2 diabetes’.


Only time will tell if the new research will change the present recommendations and people’s eating habits.